Egypt; key historical events

(inc. Suez)

 

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Aswan Dam

Suez Crisis 1956

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11/12/2016, 28 were killed and 49 injured in an ISIS bomb attack on St Mark’s Cathedral, Cairo.

28/5/2014, Abdel Fattah al Sisi was elected President of Egypt.

3/7/2013, After massive street protests across Egypt, President Morsi was deposed by the military; his regime accused of sending the country towards bankruptcy.

24/6/2012, Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood became President of Egypt.

9/10/2011, In Egypt, 24 protestors were killed and 200 injured in a crackdown by security forces.

13/4/2011, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was arrested, along with his sons, in Cairo.

11/2/2011, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak resigned after widespread protests against him, leaving Egypt governed by the military. This was during the ‘Arab Spring’.

4/2/2011, Large crowds gathered in Cairo calling for the resignation of President Mubarak.

25/1/2011, ‘Arab Spring’ protests in Egypt and Lebanon.

1/1/2011, 23 were killed and 70 injured in a bomb attack on a church in Alexandria, Egypt.

3/2/2006, An Egyptian ferry sank in the Red Sea, killing 1,300.

21/7/2005, 64 were killed by suicide bombers at the seaside resort of Sharm El Sheikh, on the Red Sea.

27/12/1993. In Cairo, Muslim militants opened fire on a tourist bus, wounding 16, including 8 Australians.

28/2/1993. In Cairo, a café used by foreigners was bombed by Muslim extremists. 4 were killed and 16 injured. Americans, Swedes, and Germans were amongst the injured.

25/1/1993. President Mubarak of Egypt vowed to end Muslim fundamentalism.

4/1/1993. Muslim fundamentalists killed two Coptic Christians in Egypt.

15/12/1991. More than 470 drowned when a ferry carrying returning Egyptian pilgrims and overseas workers sank in the Red Sea.

9/10/1984, Jordan mended relations with Egypt when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak visited Amman. Egypt had been despised by the Arab world since the late President Anwar Sadat signed a peace treaty with |Israel at Camp David in 1979. Now King Hussein of Jordan met with Arab hostility for mending relation with Egypt, a move sparked by problems in the Jordanian economy arising from a downturn in trade resulting form the Iran-Iraq war.

15/4/1982. The 5 men who killed Sadat in Egypt were executed.

10/11/1981. Hosni Mubarak became President of Egypt.

6/10/1981. President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, 62, was assassinated in Cairo, whilst attending a military parade celebrating Egyptian successes in the Yom Kippur war of 1973.   Vice President Hosni Mubarak became President.  Army members who were part of Islamic Jihad organisation killed Sadat, opposing his negotiations with Israel, which led to the historic Camp David Agreement of 1979.

15/9/1981. Sadat expelled 1,500 Soviets from Egypt.

27/12/1980, Egypt and Syria resumed diplomatic relations after a 10-year break.

26/3/1979. In Washington, USA, Mr Begin of Israel and President Sadat of Egypt signed a peace treaty. President Carter oversaw the signing.

5/6/1975. President Sadat opened the Suez Canal reopened to all international maritime traffic except Israeli shipping, after eight years of total closure since the Six-Day War.

28/2/1974. The USA and Egypt resumed diplomatic relations after a break of 7 years.

For Yom Kippur war see Israeli history.

6/11/1972, A Coptic Christian church was set alight during sectarian violence in the northern Cairo suburb of Khanka.

2/9/1971, Egypt discontinued its use of the title United Arab Republic and reverted to its old name.  See 29/9/1961.

15/1/1971, The Aswan High Dam on the Nile, built with Soviet finance and expertise, was officially opened by President Sadat, and Podgorny.

14/10/1970, Nasser’s associate, Anwar Sadat, aged 51, was elected President of Egypt.

28/9/1970. President Gamal Abdel Nasser, President of Egypt since 1954, died of a heart attack aged 52, after mediating in the Jordan civil war.

21/7/1970. The Aswan Dam in Egypt was completed. The annual Nile flooding could now be controlled, and hydro-electric power produced; the 111 metre high dam also created a significant fishing industry.

24/3/1965. Farouk I, King of Egypt from 1936 to 1952, died in exile in Italy.

14/5/1964. Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev and Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser opened the first stage of the Aswan Dam in Egypt. The Nile had been diverted four years earlier to build the dam, which created a lake 6 miles wide and 350 miles long, displacing 100,000 people but irrigating a million acres of desert for farmland. Many of Egypt’s historic sites were also flooded, but the buildings were moved to safe locations.

9/1/1960. Work began on the Aswan High Dam, Egypt.

23/8/1958, The Egyptian Government approved the Aswan Dam project.

1/2/1958. Egypt and Syria joined to form the United Arab Republic.  See 29/9/1961.

30/4/1957 Egypt reopened the Suez Canal.

8/3/1957, The Suez Canal reopened for smaller ships.

4/1/1957. In the wake of the Suez Crisis, a UN sponsored force of German tugs and salvage vessels began to clear the Suez Canal. 13 ships of various nationalities had been stranded in the Canal and could now resume sailing towards the Mediterranean. On 1/1/1957 President Colonel Gamal Nasser of Egypt had abrogated a 1954 treaty that had preciously guaranteed the UK full access to the Canal during international conflicts.

27/12/1956, Clearance work on the Suez Canal began.

22/12/1956. Britain and France withdrew their forces from Egypt, under intense pressure from the USA. The Suez Crisis had caused a run on Sterling, and the US would not halt this without a withdrawal.

22/11/1956. The withdrawal of Anglo-French troops from Port Said was completed, UN forces moved in.

15/11/1956. UN emergency forces arrived in Suez, and began to clear the Canal of wrecked ships on 27/12/1956. UN forces began taking over from the British, under strong pressure from the USA. The British PM, Anthony Eden, was suffering from psychological strain caused by the unanticipated world hostility to his Suez adventure, and flew to Jamaica on 23/11/1957 to rest.

7/11/1956. Britain and France reluctantly agreed to UN demands for a ceasefire in the Suez Crisis.

6/11/1956. Israeli forces reached Sharm El Sheikh.

2/11/1956, Gaza fell to British troops.

31/10/1956. France and Britain bombed Egyptian airfields in the Suez Crisis. The speed of events – Egypt was only given 12 hours to withdraw from the Canal – suggested to US President Eisenhower that the whole operation was staged to maintain Anglo-French influence in Suez.

See also Britain, France, Israel

29/10/1956. 5.pm. Israeli troops invaded the Sinai Peninsula and troops pushed on towards the Suez Canal, ostensibly to destroy guerrilla strongholds, coming within 20 miles of the Canal. 30,000 tank-supported Israeli troops invaded Gaza and the Sinai Peninsula, in retaliation “for Egyptian attacks on land and sea communications near Gaza”. Israeli forces wanted to reach the gun batteries at Sharm El Sheikh at the tip of the Sinai peninsula which were closing the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping. These batteries were destroyed on 5/11/1956.

This was part of the Suez Crisis in which President Nasser nationalised the canal. See 16/11/1869, 26/7/1956, and 23/6/1956. On 30/10/1956 Britain and France issued an ultimatum to Egypt and Israel to stop fighting and on 31/10/1956 France and Britain invaded the Suez area ‘to stop the Israeli-Egyptian fighting. Nasser closed the canal by sinking 47 old ships full of concrete in it. In fact this move had been pre-planned with Israel’s co-operation. On 25/10/1956 the  British, French, and Israeli PMs, Anthony Eden, Guy Mollet, and David Ben Gurion, had met in secret at Sevres. On 6/11/1956 Anglo-French forces, 600 British and 487 French paratroopers, seized the Canal itself, having landed at Port Said. The UN ordered a ceasefire on 8/11/1956. The US condemned the invasion and the UN saw the rare sight of US and USSR delegates voting together. The US had threatened not to defend Sterling against a run on international markets against it unless the UK pulled out of Suez.

Because of the fighting, backed by Britain and France, and ended by a UN ceasefire, the Canal was closed for more than six months, blocked by sunken ships. UK petrol rationing began on 23/11/1956, see this date. The Canal closed again during the Arab-Israeli war of 1967 and did not reopen until 1975. However by then very large oil tankers had been developed that were too deep to pass through the canal. It is hoped that plans to deepen the Canal and reduce fees will revive the enterprise (2001).

23/9/1956, Britain and France took the Suez issue to the UN Security Council.

29/8/1956, Major build up of British and French forces in the eastern Mediterranean, to intimidate Egypt.

1/8/1956, The US, Britain, and France met to talk about the Suez problem. On 8/8/1956 Eden said Nasser could not be trusted.

30/7/1956, Eden tells Nasser he cannot have the Suez Canal and imposed an arms embargo on Egypt.

26/7/1956. Nasser nationalised the Suez Canal a month after taking power. Nasser wanted the tolls from the Canal to pay for the Aswan Dam construction. On 28/7/1956 the Cabinet met in London and agreed that as a last resort military means would be used if the Canal was not kept open for free passage of ships in perpetuity, not just until the Suez Canal Company’s concession ran out in November 1968. On 9/9/1956 Nasser rejected US plans for international control over the Canal.

19/7/1956. Britain and the USA withdrew financial support for Egypt under its new leader, Nasser, who was seen as too pro-Soviet.

23/6/1956. General Gamal Adbel Nasser was elected Egypt’s first president. However voting was compulsory and he was the only candidate. Nasser graduated from the Royal Military Academy in Cairo in 1938, aged 20, and was wounded in the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. Appointed Prime Minister of Egypt in 1954, he enjoyed popular support.

13/6/1956, The last British troops left the Suez Canal Zone.

4/6/1956, Egypt announced that it would not renew the Suez Canal Company’s concession when it expired in 1968.

2/3/1955. Egypt and Syria signed a defensive pact.

17/11/1954, Nasser became official head of state in Egypt, see 17/4/1954.

26/10/1954, An assassination attempt on Egyptian Prime Minister Gamal Abdel Nasser failed.

19/10/1954, Colonel Nasser of Egypt agreed with Britain a timetable for the withdrawal of Britain from the Canal Zone within two years.

27/7/1954, The UK Government agreed to Colonel Nasser’s request to pull British troops out of Suez. They were to leave by 1956.

21/7/1954. Britain, America and the World Bank turned down a request for aid from President Nasser of Egypt to build the Aswan Dam.

17/4/1954. Colonel Nasser took power in Egypt from President Neguib and became Prime Minister.

18/6/1953, Egypt declared itself a republic.

24/5/1953, The Foreign Office advised British families to leave Egypt.

16/1/1953, Egypt dissolved all political parties.

26/7/1952. King Farouk abdicated as King of Egypt.  General Neguib was the first president.This ended the 148-year-old Egyptian monarchy which had begun in 1805 with Ottoman Viceroy Mohammed Ali. Farouk was the 10th generation of Ali’s descendants. General Gamel Abdel Nasser had orchestrated the coup behind the scenes, organising the revolutionary secret Free Officers group that had ousted Farouk. In 1954 Nasser overthrew Neguib as ruler of Egypt. Nasser then held ‘elections’ in which his was the only name on the ballot paper; Nasser got 99.95% of the vote.

23/7/1952, General Neguib marched on Cairo, to overthrow King Farouk I.

27/1/1952, Anti-British rioters in Egypt burnt down the Shepheard Hotel, killing 17.

25/1/1952, British troops captured the police headquarters in Ismalia, Egypt; 46 Egyptians were killed This followed guerrilla attacks on British bases in Egypt, in which the British suspected police complicity.

4/12/1951, British forces attacked in Egypt during anti-British riots.

20/11/1951, Evacuation of British Army families from Egypt began.

22/10/1951, Britain stopped arms exports to Egypt.

21/10/1951, Four British warships arrived at Port Said, at the northern end of the Suez Canal.

19/10/1951. British troops seized the Suez Canal Zone after Egypt abrogated the 1936 Treaty.

10/9/1951, Anti-British riots in Egypt.

5/4/1951, The UK Government approved, in principle, of withdrawing troops from the Suez Canal.

16/11/1950, King Farook of Egypt demanded immediate evacuation of British troops from the Suez Canal.

17/3/1948. King Farouk of Egypt laid the foundation stone of the Aswan Dam.

2/1/1939, Howard Carter, British Egyptologist who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, died.

26/5/1937. Egypt joined the League of Nations.

26/8/1936. A treaty (The Anglo-Egyptian Alliance) ended the British protectorate over Egypt and gave Britain control over the Suez Canal for the next 20 years.

28/4/1936, Farouk, aged 16, became King of Egypt on the death of his father, King Fuad (68). Fuad had become monarch in 1922 when Britain granted limited independence to Egypt.

6/8/1929, Britain and Egypt agreed a draft treaty for the withdrawal of British troops from Egypt, except from the Canal Zone.

1928, The Muslim Brotherhood was founded in Egypt by the Sunni Islamic scholar, Hassan al-Banna.

15/3/1924. The first Egyptian Parliament opened.

15/3/1923, Fuad I was proclaimed King of Egypt.

17/2/1923. Tutenkhamen’s tomb opened by the Egyptologist Howard Carter. Carter was born in Swaffham, Norfolk, on 9/5/1873, and joined the British – sponsored archaeological survey of Egypt at the age of 17. He died in London in 1939.

26/11/1922. The tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen was discovered by Howard Carter and his patron, Lord Carnarvon.

15/3/1922, Britain abolished its protectorate over Egypt and recognised its independence.

28/2/1922, The British Protectorate over Egypt ended, and Ahmed Fuad was proclaimed King.

23/5/1921. British troops entered Alexandria, Egypt, to quell nationalist rioting.

11/2/1920, King Farouk, last King of Egypt, was born in Cairo, son of King Fuad I.

25/12/1918, Anwar Sadat, President of Egypt, was born in Talah Minufiya.

15/1/1918, Gamal Nasser, the first President of Egypt, was born in Alexandria.

20/12/1914, The British Protectorate of Egypt was established, with Hussein Kamil as Sultan.

19/12/1914. Britain declared Egypt to be a British Protectorate, deposing the ruler, Khedive Abbas II, who had sided with Germany’s ally, Turkey. Abbas II, born 14/7/1874, who succeeded his father on 8/1/1892, died in Geneva on 21/12/1944.

22/10/1914. Britain ordered all foreign ships out of the Suez Canal.

20/2/1910, Egypt’s Christian PM, Butros Ghali, was assassinated by a Nationalist.

10/12/1902. The large dam at Aswan, Egypt, was completed. At 130 foot high, with a 114 mile long lake, it had taken four years to build.

7/12/1894, Ferdinand de Lesseps, French diplomat and engineer who promoted the Suez Canal, died aged 89.

7/1/1892, Abbas II became the Khedive of Egypt (ruled to 1914).

10/1/1890, Cleopatra’s tomb was discovered.

29/10/1889. Britain, Germany, Austria, France, Spain, Italy, The Netherlands, Russia, and the Ottoman Empire signed an agreement that the Suez Canal was neutral and open in wartime as well as peacetime to all ships.

14/9/1882, British troops occupied Cairo.

13/9/1882. A British Expeditionary Force under Lieutenant-General Sir Garnet Wolseley routed the Egyptian forces under Arabi Pasha at Tel el Kebir. Britain feared for the safety of the Suez Canal.

3/8/1882, Suez was occupied by British marines.

24/7/1882, Arabi Pasha declared a Holy War in Egypt.

11/7/1882. A British fleet bombarded Alexandria in retaliation for nationalist violence in which 50 Europeans died.

11/6/1882. (see 31/8/1801). After a mutiny of soldiers in Alexandria in 1881, an Anglo-French fleet arrived off the town in May 1882. This provoked a massacre of Europeans in Alexandria on 11/6/1882. The ruler of Egypt, Arabi Pasha, was strengthening the system of forts in Egypt and failed to respond to an ultimatum issued on 10/7/1882 by the British Admiral, Sir Beauchamp Seymour (Lord Alcester). Hence the British invaded and occupied the whole of Egypt.

12/9/1878. Cleopatra’s Needle, an ancient red granite Egyptian obelisk 68.5 feet high, originally made for Thothmes III in 1460 BC, was presented to Britain and re-erected on the Thames Embankment.

27/11/1875. Britain bought Suez Canal shares. Britain bought nearly half the shares for £4million from the Khedive, or ruler, of Egypt. Disraeli, the British Prime Minister, was relieved to have prevented total French control of the Canal. When the Canal was built six years ago with French money and French expertise the British, under Gladstone, took no interest; now Britain accounts for 80% of the Canal traffic. On 15/11/1875 Disraeli learned that the Khedive owned 177,000 of the 400,000 shares but was on the verge of bankruptcy and wanted to sell, or at least mortgage the shares to a French syndicate. The British put pressure on the French syndicate who, without government help, pulled out, whilst Baron Lionel de Rothschild provided finance for the British to buy the shares for UK£ 4 million.

26/5/1871, Ismailia was annexed to Egypt.

17/11/1869. The Suez Canal was opened after 10 years of construction. The 100-mile canal, from Port Said to Port Tewfik, 26 feet deep, with bays and use of lakes to provide passing places for ships and avoid the need for locks, was designed by Ferdinand De Lesseps. The distance from London to Bombay by sea was reduced from 11,220 to 6,332 miles. The Canal concession was granted to de Lesseps by Said Pasha, after whom Port Said is named. The cost was 400million francs, ten times the original estimate. See 25/4/1859. By 1875 Britain was the largest shareholder in the Canal. In 1870 there were 486 transits, and in 1966/67, 20,326 transits. President Nasser nationalised the Canal in 1956, see 29/10/1956.

26/3/1868, King Fuad I of Egypt was born.

25/4/1859. Construction of the 100 mile Suez Canal began. Constructed by both Egyptian and French companies, under the direction of Ferdinand de Lesseps, it opened on 17/11/1869. It was 163 km long and had a minimum width of 60 metres. In 2000, some 25,000 ships used this canal.

30/11/1854. The Frenchman Ferdinand de Lesseps obtained, from the Egyptian ruler Said Pasha, a 99-year concession to build a canal between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean.

13/7/1854, Abbas I, Khedive of Egypt, was murdered, aged 41. He was succeeded by his uncle, 32-year old Said Pasha.

2/8/1849. Mohammed Ali, ruler of Egypt from 1805 to 1848, died. Apart from his military successes, he laid the foundations of a modern educational and administrative system, and revolutionised the Egyptian economy.

1811, The Malelukes were massacred by Mehmet Ali (born 1769 in Macedonia, died 1849). 470 of them were killed in Cairo and some 1,200 across the whole of Egypt. He then went on to fight the Wahabi tribe in Arabia, on the instructions of the Ottoman Porte, a campaign which secured him the Hejaz region. This campaign was successfully concluded by Ali’s son, Ibrahim, who also subdued the Sudan.

19/11/1805, Ferdinand de Lesseps, French diplomat and engineer, builder of the Suez Canal, was born in Versailles.

31/8/1801. The British captured Alexandria, Egypt, from the French under Napoleon. Alexandria had, despite its classical prominence, become by 1801 an insignificant town. The French occupied the town on 2/7/1798, and captured Cairo on 3//8/1801.

21/3/1801, At the Battle of Alexandria, The French made a surprise attack on the British near Alexandria, Egypt. The British under General Abercrombie defeated the French, but Abercrombie himself was mortally wounded.

8/3/1801, The British Army captured Aboukir, Egypt.

See also France for British-French military conflict 1801 in Egypt

19/7/1799. The Rosetta Stone was found near the town of Rosetta on the Nile, bearing Greek, Hieroglyphic, and Demotic (ancient Egyptian) scripts.

1/8/1798. At the Battle of the Nile, at Aboukir Bay, Admiral Nelson, on the ship Vanguard, destroyed 11 out of 13 French battleships which were the convoy that took Napoleon to Egypt.  The French commander was Brueys, aboard the ship L’Orient.  The crew were mostly ashore getting water, leaving no one to man the 120 French guns. This effectively trapped the French Army in Egypt.  Five French ships with 5,000 men were sunk, 2 ships were captured, and 2 ships managed to escape from Nelson.  On 10/2/1799 Napoleon left Egypt for Syria, occupying Gaza on 24/2/1799. On 7/3/1799 Napoleon captured Jaffa, where his soldiers massacred over 2,0000 Albanian prisoners. On 17/5/1799 Napoleon lifted the siege of Acre after failing to capture it.

23/7/1798. An uprising by the people of Cairo against the French occupiers was brutally repressed on 22/10/1798. The French captured Suez on 7/12/1798. However a British expeditionary force arrived in Egypt on 6/3/1801. The battle of Alexandria was fought on 11/3/1801, just outside the actual town. After this British victory the British advanced on the town which surrendered on 31/8. See 11/6/1882.

1254, The first Mameluke Sultan acceded. The Mamelukes (Arabic = ‘slaves’) were horse mounted soldiers, originally Circassian slaves, but became powerful enough to install their own ruler this year. The Mameluke Dynasty was overthrown by Selim I in 1517 but continued to run the country behind the scenes. They were heavily defeated by the French in the late 1700s, and massacred by Mehmet Ali in 1811.

4/3/1193. Saladdin, Sultan of Egypt, died.

879, Ibn Tulun, the oldest mosque in Cairo, was built.

17/9/642. Alexandria, Egypt, surrendered to the Arabs led by Amr Ibn Al-As. Amr invaded Syria in 633 and attacked Egypt in 639, taking Pelusium in January 640 and Heliopolis in June 640. In 646 Amr defeated a Greek attempt to retake Alexandria. Amr died, as governor of Egypt, on 6/1/664. The Arabs moved on south to conquer Nubia, also conquering Cyrenicia and Tripolitania in 643.

616, Persia  invaded Egypt.

See Roman Empire for Roman occupation of Egypt

22/6/217 BCE, Egyptian native hoplites under Ptolemy IV crushed the Seleucid army under Antiochus III at Raphia near Gaza.

221 BCE, Ptolemy III died aged 61. He was succeeded by his 23 year old son, Ptolemy IV, who co-ruled with his sister and wife Arsinoe III; he ruled for 18 years.

243 BCE, Revolt in Egypt forced Ptolemy III to return from military adventures in Syria.

245 BCE, Ptolemy III conquered Babylon and Susa.

246 BCE, Ptolemy Soter II died aged 63. He was succeeded by his sone who ruled as Ptolemy III until 221 BCE.

26/6/285 BCE, Egypt's Ptolemy I Soter abdicated. He was succeeded by his youngest son by his wife Berenice Ptolemy II Philadelphus, who had been co-regent for three years.

332 BCE, Alexander the Great founded the port of Alexandria.

Ca. 568 BCE, King Nebuchadnezzar II conquered Egypt.

594 BCE, Pharaoh Necho died (acceded 610 BCE)

605 BCE, Pharaoh Necho was defeated at Carchemish by the son of Nabopalassar of the Chadeans.

710 BCE, Egypt conquered by Ethiopia.

950 BCE, First verified cultivation of poppies in Egypt.

954 BCE, The Egyptian throne was usurped by the Libyan, ruler Sheshonk. He founded the 22nd (Bubastite) Dynasty which lasted for 200 years.

See also Jewish History

E,

1160 BCE, Pharaoh Ramses V died.

1198 BCE, Egypt’s 20th Dynasty began. Pharaoah Ramses III began ruling. His reign lasted until 1167 BCE.

1215 BCE, Pharaoh Merneptah died.

1221 BCE, Pharaoh Merneptah defeated an invading force of Libyans.

1225 BCE, Pharaoh Ramses II died. He was succeded by his son, Merneptah, who ruled until 1215 BCE.

1272 BCE, Egypt made peace with the Hittites.

1292 BCE, Pharaoh Seti I died and was succeeded by his son, Ramses II, who ruled until 1225 BCE.

1313 BCE, Ramses I died and was succeeded by his son, Seti I, who ruled until 1292 BCE. Under Seti I, Egypt conquered Libya and made peace with the Hittites.

1315 BCE, Pharaoh Harmhab died, and was succeeded by the elderly Ramses I.

1350 BCE, The Egyptian throne was seized by the soldier, Harmhab; he ruled until 1315 BCE, founding the 19th Dynasty.

1358 BCE, Amenhotep IV died and was succeeded by his 9-year-old son in law, Tutankhamen.

1374 BCE, Amenhotep IV introduced monotheism, worship of the Sun God..

1375 BCE, Pharaoh Amenhotep III died after a 36-year reign. Under his rule, Babylonia had recognised Egyptian hegemony over the region, and Nubia had been subdued. He wasd succeeded by his son, Amenhotep IV (Ikhnaton); however the Hittites under King Suppiluliumas were soon to attack Egypt under Amenhotep IV’s weak rule.

1380 BCE, A canal was constructed by Pharaoh Amenhotep III from the Nile to the Red Sea using slave labour (see 609 BCE).

1411 BCE, Pharaoah Thutmose IV died after a 9-year reign. He was succeeded by his son who ruled as Pharaoh Amenhotep III, last great monarch of the Middle Kingdom, who ruled until 1375 BCE.

1420 BCE, Pharaoh Amenhotep II died and was succeeded by his son, who ruled as Pharaoh Thutmose IV until 1411 BCE.

1447 BCE, Pharaoh Thutmose III died and was succeeded by his son, who ruled as Pharaoh Amenhotep II until 1420 BCE.

1492 BCE, Egyptians reached the Land of Punt, probably modern-day Ethiopia.

1493 BCE, Pharaoh Thutmose I died after a brief illness. His weak son Thutmose II was dispossessed of the throne  by Thutmose III, who ruled until 1447 BCE.

1496 BCE, Pharaoh Pharaoh Thutmose II was deposed by his father, Thutmose I, who then co-ruled with his brother, Thutmose III until 1493 BCE.

1501 BCE, Pharaoh Thutmose I was deposed. He was succeeded by his illegitimate son who ruled as Pharaoh Thutmose II until 1496 BCE.

1540 BCE, Pharaoh Amenhotep I died. He was succeeded by Pharaoh Thutmose I, who was not of royal descent; he ruled until 1501 BCE.

1557 BCE, Pharaoh Amasis died after a 32-year reign. He was succeeded by his son, Amenhotep I, who ruled until 1540 BCE.

1570 BCE, The New Kingdom was founded by Pharaoh Amasis, 18th Dynasty. He drove out the Hyksos and reunited Upper and Lower Egypt; the New Kingdom lasted until 332 BCE.

1680 BCE, The horse as war weapon was introduced to Egypt by invading Hyksos tribesmen from Syria.

1792 BCE, The 12th Dynasty ended with the death of Pharaoh Amenemhet IV.

1801 BCE, Pharaoh Amenemhet III died, and was succeeded by his son Amenemhet IV, who ruled until 1792 BCE.

1849 BCE, Pharaoh Sesostris III died, and was succeeded by his son as Amenemhet III, who ruled until 1801 BCE. He developed copper mines in the Sinai region, adding to Egypt’s wealth.

1887 BCE, Pharaoh Sesostris II died, and was succeeded by his son, Sesostris III, who ruled until 1849 BCE.

1903 BCE, Pharaoh Amenemhet II died, and was succeeded by his son, Sesostris II, who ruled until 1887 BCE.

1935 BCE, Pharaoh Sesostris I died, and was succeeded by his son, Pharaoh Amenemhet II, who ruled until 1903 BCE.

1970 BCE, Pharaoh Amenemhet I, founder of the 12th Dynasty, died after a 30-year reign. He was succeeded by his son as Pharaoh Sesostris I, who ruled until 1935 BCE. He completed the conquest of Nubia.

2300 BCE, Egyptian explorer Harkhuf explored up the Nile.

2550 BCE, The Great Pyramid was completed.

2850 BCE, Pharaoh Khafre became the third ruler of the Fourth Dynasty.

2900 BCE, The Fourth Dynasty was founed by Pharaoh Khufu (Cheops). He reigned for 23 years.

2920 BCE, Pharaoah Snefru developed copper mines, and built large ships to facilitate overseas trade. Cedars were being imported from Lebanon. Egypt had subdued Nubia and Libya. He was the last Pharaoah of the Third Dynasty.

2980 BCE, Egypt’s Third Dynasty was founded by Pharaoah Zoser. He ruled for 30 years with assistance from his adviser and doctor, Imhotep.

3100 BCE, Upper and Lower Egypt united under King Menes.

3300 BCE, Urban centres developed in the lower Nile Valley; start of hieroglyphics.

4241 BCE, The Egyptians developed a calendar with 12 months of 30 days plus 5 extra days.

 

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